Sites affected by the Heart Bleed Virus

my_bleeding_heart_by_kilroyart-d4t4sgfNEW YORK (CNNMoney) – Websites are racing to patch the Heartbleed bug, the worst security hole the Internet has ever seen.
The Heart Bleed virus has been affecting millions of websites on the Internet for two years, but there are ways to protect yourself from the bug, according to reports. Though users don’t have much power over the Heart Bleed virus — website administrators and creators have to update their OpenSSL software — there are ways to defend important passwords on Gmail, Facebook, Yahoo! and other sites.

As sites fix the bug on their end, it’s time for you to change your passwords. The Heartbleed bug allowed information leaks from a key safety feature that is supposed to keep your online communication private — email, banking, shopping, and passwords.

If you want to check to see if a website has bee affected, you can go to this site.

However, if a major website is still vulnerable to the Heart Bleed bug, changing a password won’t matter; the website would have to update their software first. To defend against this, an online tool called the Heartbleed test was created to test if a website has been compromised by the virus. Simply type the web address of the website into the box, and it will let you know whether it is safe. Sites like Facebook, Gmail, Amazon, Yahoo!, Twitter and others have already updated their software.

Many companies are not informing their customers of the danger — or asking them to update their log-in credentials. So, here’s a handy password list. It’ll be updated as companies respond to CNN’s questions.

Change these passwords now (they were patched)

Google+, YouTube and Gmail
Facebook
Yahoo, Yahoo Mail, Tumblr, Flickr
OKCupid

Don’t worry about these (they don’t use the affected software, or ran a different version)

AOL and Mapquest
Bank of America
Charles Schwab
Chase bank
Fidelity
E*Trade
HSBC bank
Microsoft, Hotmail and Outlook
PayPal
Scottrade
TD Ameritrade
Wells Fargo bank
U.S. Bank

Don’t change these passwords yet (still unclear, no response)

Amazon
American Express
Apple, iCloud and iTunes
Capital One bank
Citibank
LinkedIn
PNC bank
Twitter (the company said Twitter’s servers weren’t affected but also noted that Twitter used the affected software in some capacity.)
Wikipedia

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